Mercredi 13 septembre 2006 3 13 /09 /Sep /2006 18:42

 

 

SOLITARY  FIBROUS TUMOR  MRI


 

A 57-year-old man presented with a five-year history

 of increasing general abdominal pain, weight loss, and difficulty voiding.

Imaging Findings

Computed Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Images, Sagittal View
Magnetic Resonance Images, Coronal View
Gross Pathology Specimen
Histology

Pre-biopsy, non-contrast axial CT through the upper pelvis demonstrates a large soft tissue mass displacing the bowel loops.

There is one focal area of lower attenuation, perhaps representing fat.

Pre- and post-contrast sagittal MR images of the pelvis show that the lesion is homogeneously slightly hyperintense to muscle.

 Pre- and post-contrast coronal images demonstrate hyperintensity on T1. This is likely a bladder or prostate lesion.

Differential Diagnosis

The differential diagnosis of a large bladder mass includes transitional cell carcinoma (although this is an unusually large presentation), adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and schistosomiasis.

The differential diagnosis for a large prostate mass includes adenocarcinoma and sarcoma.

Diagnosis

Solitary fibrous tumor

Discussion

Pathology Discussion

The specimen consists of a large (13 cm), well circumscribed, firm mass attached to the posterior serosal bladder wall. The mass does not invade the bladder. The gross appearance suggests a benign lesion. The low-power view of the cells shows a variegated appearance caused by the mixture of hypercellular and hypocellular areas. The cells are bland and spindle with associated characteristic collagen fibers. The sample was strongly positive for CD-34, which supports the diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor.

Radiology Discussion

The differential diagnosis for bladder filling defects includes:

 

  • Malignant tumors (Primary bladder tumor, metastasis [e.g., prostate, uterus, cervix, colon])
  • Benign bladder neoplasms (leiomyoma, fibroepithelial polyp, hemangioma, adenoma, pheochromocytoma)
  • Blood clot
  • Edema (adjacent to calculi)
  • Ureterocele
  • Enlarged prostate gland
  • Muscular wall hypertrophy
  • Post-operative change
  • Endometriosis
  • Fungus ball

Solitary fibrous tumors are likely of either mesothelial cell origin or fibroblast/primitive mesenchymal cell origin. The most common locations for these tumors are the pleura and mediastinum. Other reported locations include the abdominal cavity, parotid gland, pericardium, ovary, liver, intestine, lung, orbit, upper respiratory tract, bladder and periosteum. The unifying characteristic of solitary fibrous tumors is positive staining for CD-34, resulting from the spindle cells. Cases have been reported in patients from 9 to 86 years of age (average age: 57 years) and appear to be nearly evenly distributed between males and females.

CT is useful for assessment of pelvic sidewall, adjacent viscera, and evaluation of lymphadenopathy; it is limited in differentiating post-operative or post-radiation change vs. tumor. CT staging is 75% accurate.

MR is better than CT for staging and for evaluation of bladder base or dome tumors. T2 sequencing is effective for evaluating the urine-bladder wall interface, while T1 shows the interface between the bladder and perivesical fat. Gadolinium helps assess small tumors.

 

References

Zagoria RJ, Tung GA. Genitourinary Radiology: The Requisites. Mosby, St. Louis, 1997.

Zotalis G, Hicks DG. Solitary fibrous tumor of the soft tissues. Archives of Hellenic Pathology. 11(3), 1997.

 

 


Dear Visitors: Nothing on this World Wide Web site should be considered medical advice. Only your own doctor can help you make decisions about your medical care. It is not the policy of the Brigham and Women's Hospital Department of Radiology to provide consultation on the World Wide Web or via e-mail. If you have a specific medical question or are seeking medical care, please call the Brigham and Women's Hospital toll-free physician referral line at 1-800-294-9999.

Is this a mirrored page?
The official homepage of the BrighamRAD Teaching Case Database is http://brighamrad.harvard.edu/education/online/tcd/tcd.html

 

Contact the BrighamRAD Design Team for additional
Par SPINNEUR - Publié dans : PELVIS MOU PROSTATE SCROTUM PENIS
Voir les 0 commentaires
Mercredi 13 septembre 2006 3 13 /09 /Sep /2006 18:06
A 28-year-old woman presented for imaging associated with an evaluation of primary infertility.

 

Ultrasound Images



Magnetic Resonance



Gross Pathology Specimen

Histology

A transverse ultrasound image through the uterus demonstrates a solid mass abutting the endometrial stripe, and a sagittal image shows a 15-mm endometrial canal. There is some central hypoechoic fluid. There is some lobulation in the contour along the left aspect of the endometrial stripe and mass effect is apparent. The differential diagnosis at this point includes leiomyoma, leiomyosarcoma, or possibly an obstructive mass, such as simple fibroid, endometrioma, or adnexal mass arising from the ovary.

MR images show that the uterus is displaced posteriorly and to the left by the large, primarily hypointense soft tissue mass. The mass has central areas of hyperintensity.

There appears to be a superior component to the mass, suggesting a bi-lobed, well-encapsulated lesion.

Based on this appearance, primary uterine tumors would be excluded from the differential diagnosis.

 A normal right ovary is visible, but the left ovary is displaced posteriorly; so, this could be a complex mass arising from the left ovary. The differential diagnosis includes cystadenoma, endometrioma, ovarian metastasis, and cystadenocarcinoma. The post-contrast image shows some areas of enhancement, suggesting necrosis; there is not significant enhancement of the mass.

 

 

 

Differential Diagnosis

The differential diagnosis includes cystadenoma, endometrioma, ovarian metastasis, and cystadenocarcinoma.

 

Diagnosis

Ovarian fibroma

 

 

Discussion

Pathology Discussion

The gross sample is a 15-cm ovarian mass. Cystic degeneration is apparent on the cortical surface. The cut surface demonstrates a whorled, trabecular appearance; the mass is solid. There is no evidence of hemorrhage or necrosis. On low-power microscopy, spindle cells are apparent. At high power, the spindles are seen to be composed of fibroblastic ovarian cells with a stromal appearance. Some papillary projections are present on the cortical surface.

Radiology Discussion

On ultrasound, ovarian fibroma appears as a hypoechoic mass with attenuation of the ultrasound beam. On MR, these masses demonstrate low signal on T2 relative to the myometrium due to the predominantly fibrous composition of the mass. On CT, ovarian fibroma is a well-defined, solid mass with mild heterogeneity. Ovarian fibromas may calcify and/or exhibit cystic degeneration. They are bilateral in 3-10% of cases. Ascites is present in 10-15% of cases, especially with larger lesions.

Ovarian fibromas are the most common solid primary tumors of the ovary but are often found incidentally in the perimenopausal period. They are comprised of intersecting bundles of spindle cells. Less than 1% undergo malignant transformation to fibrosarcoma. One percent of cases are associated with Meigs syndrome, characterized by ovarian fibroma, ascites, and pleural effusion. These masses are also associated with Gorlin syndrome (basal cell nevus syndrome), characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, skeletal anomalies, jaw cysts, and ectopic calcifications.

The differential diagnosis includes pedunculated uterine fibroid, lymphoma, metastasis, and solid ovarian neoplasms, such as:

 

  • Germ cell tumors: dysgerminomas, endodermal sinus (yolk sac), immature teratoma
  • Stromal tumors: Sertoli-Leydig, thecoma
  • Epithelial tumors: Brenner, undifferentiated epithelial tumor

Signs suggestive of malignancy in ovarian tumors include the mass being solid, especially with poor sound transmission, size greater than 10 cm, internal vascularity with high flow (RI < 0.4 or PI > 1.0), advanced age, extension of the tumor into the pelvis or surrounding viscera, ascites, and metastatic spread.

 

 

 

References

Brant WE. Genital Tract and Bladder Ultrasound. In: Brant WE, Helms CA, ed. Fundamentals of Diagnostic Radiology. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 1999: 865-867.

Dahnert W. Radiology Review Manual. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1999: 874

Lyons EA. Obstetric and Gynecologic Imaging. In: Juhl JH, Crummy AB, Kuhlman JE, ed. Essentials of Radiologic Imaging. Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven Publishing, 1998: 763-766.

 

 

 


Dear Visitors: Nothing on this World Wide Web site should be considered medical advice. Only your own doctor can help you make decisions about your medical care. It is not the policy of the Brigham and Women's Hospital Department of Radiology to provide consultation on the World Wide Web or via e-mail. If you have a specific medical question or are seeking medical care, please call the Brigham and Women's Hospital toll-free physician referral line at 1-800-294-9999.

Is this a mirrored page?
The official homepage of the BrighamRAD Teaching Case Database is http://brighamrad.harvard.edu/education/online/tcd/tcd.html

Par SPINNEUR - Publié dans : PELVIS MOU PROSTATE SCROTUM PENIS
Voir les 0 commentaires
Mercredi 13 septembre 2006 3 13 /09 /Sep /2006 17:44

IRM  du coeur , MYXOME de l 'oreillette droite ,

RIGHT  ATRIAL MYXOMA  HEART MRI


A 56-year-old woman presented with distended neck veins.

 

 

Imaging Findings

Axial T1 MRI
Axial Balanced MRI
Axial T1 gadolinium-balanced MRI
Coronal T1 MRI
Gross Pathology
Microscopic Pathology

Chest radiograph was normal. Cardiac evaluation included an echocardiogram, which demonstrated a right atrial mass possibly extending into the inferior vena cava (IVC).

The MRI examination included ECG-gated spin echo as well as cine sequences. T1-weighted coronal and axial images show a slightly lobular right atrial mass (arrows). This mass is of homogeneous intermediate signal intensity, heterogeneously enhanced with gadolinium (arrows), and measures 5 cm in largest dimension. The mass extends to the origin of the IVC but does not extend more inferiorly. On an axial balanced sequence (intermediate between T1 and T2), the mass extends into the right ventricle (arrows).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Differential Diagnosis

The presence of contrast enhancement in this mass makes the diagnosis of thrombus, the most common intracardiac mass, unlikely in this patient. A primary intracardiac tumor is the most likely possibility. The most frequent benign tumors are myxoma and lipoma, and the most ommon malignant tumor is angiosarcoma. Secondary tumors of the heart occur 40-50 times more frequently than primary cardiac tumors but are less likely in this patient because of the lack of a known primary neoplasm, absence of other metastatic foci, and lack of extension into the IVC as seen in renal cell carcinoma.

Diagnosis

Right atrial myxoma

 

 

Discussion

Radiology

Myxoma is the most common benign intracardiac tumor in adults accounting for nearly 40% of all cardiac tumors. Myxoma is three times more commonly seen in the left atrium compared to the right. A ventricular location is unusual. The tumor may protrude into a ventricle causing partial obstruction of the atrioventricular valve.

MRI has demonstrated the various configurations of the myxoma: [1] a spherical mass with a narrow pedicle attached to the interatrial septum, [2] a tumor with a wide base of septal attachment, or [3] a tumor attached to the atrial side of the mitral valve.

Pathology

Myxomas are the most common primary cardiac neoplasm, often arising from the intraatrial septum (left more often than right). As in this patient, the tumors are often pedunculated and/or lobulated gelatinous masses that can obstruct or swing back and forth through the atrioventricular valves, damaging the valve cusps.

Microscopically, myxomas have an abundant mucopolysaccharide matrix and vascular channels with varying numbers of distinctive stellate or plump "myxoma" cells (left slide). Tumor-associated thrombus, degeneration, hemorrhage, calcification, inflammatory infiltrate (basophils) or superinfection may lead to an incorrect diagnosis of mural thrombi or endocardial vegetations (right slide). Similar ardiac presentation of sarcomas have been rarely described and may present initial diagnostic confusion.

 

 

References

1. Higgins CB, Hricak H, Helms CA. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body. 2nd ed. New York: Raven, 1992: 551-558.

2. Freedberg RS, Kronzon I, Rumanik WM, Liebeskind D. The ontribution of MRI to the evaluation of intracardiac tumors diagnosed by echocardiography. Circulation 1988;77:94-103.

Par SPINNEUR - Publié dans : COEUR -HEART THORAX - AORTA.
Voir les 0 commentaires
Mercredi 13 septembre 2006 3 13 /09 /Sep /2006 17:42

 IRM  MR  MR Imaging , Neurology's clinical cases , Cas cliniques, NEUROLOGIE  IRM Cérébrale , spinale ,

ICONOCERF-MEDIMAG


English version


Iconocerf est la banque d'images numériques du CERF et de la SFR.

FRENCH  UNIVERSITIES  FRENCH RADIOLOGY



Conception : R. Duvauferrier, M. Rambeau, M. André
Promotion, fabrication : A. Pilat, laboratoire Schering
Mise au format HTML : B. Pouliquen, H. Lesaux
Serveur de la médiathèque informatique de la faculté de médecine : P. Le Beux, D. Delamarre

Notre serveur vous donne accès à

3860 cas cliniques < 13715 images>
NOUVEAU :(Dernière mise à jour : 12/03/97)

Acquisition des CD ICONOCERF-MEDIMAG

Un accès à tous les cas cliniques par un index général
Accès aux dossiers par l'histoire de la maladie (objectif pédagogique)

Et toujours notre nouvelle ergonomie :

  • Accès aux cas cliniques par des menus et sous-menus
  • Commentaires associés cachés
  • Accès direct aux auteurs des cas cliniques

Neurologie

           397 cases

Faculte de medecine:Sommaire fac. de médecine     Sommaire CERF

 


 

 
CERF

Par SPINNEUR - Publié dans : CNS/SNC/BRAIN/CERVEAU.
Voir les 0 commentaires
Mercredi 13 septembre 2006 3 13 /09 /Sep /2006 17:42

 

ICONOCERF-MEDIMAG

[English version]
Iconocerf est la banque d'images numériques du CERF et de la SFR.
Conception : R. Duvauferrier, M. Rambeau, M. André
Promotion, fabrication : A. Pilat, laboratoire Schering
Mise au format HTML : B. Pouliquen, H. Lesaux
Serveur de la médiathèque informatique de la faculté de médecine : P. Le Beux, D. Delamarre

Notre serveur vous donne accès à 3860 cas cliniques < 13715 images>
NOUVEAU :(Dernière mise à jour : 12/03/97)

Acquisition des CD ICONOCERF-MEDIMAG

Un accès à tous les cas cliniques par un index général
Accès aux dossiers par l'histoire de la maladie (objectif pédagogique)

Et toujours notre nouvelle ergonomie :

  • Accès aux cas cliniques par des menus et sous-menus
  • Commentaires associés cachés
  • Accès direct aux auteurs des cas cliniques

Neurologie

           [397 cas ]

Faculte de medecine:Sommaire fac. de médecine     Sommaire CERF

 


 
CERF

Par SPINNEUR - Publié dans : CNS/SNC/BRAIN/CERVEAU.
Voir les 0 commentaires
Mercredi 13 septembre 2006 3 13 /09 /Sep /2006 17:42

 

ICONOCERF-MEDIMAG

[English version]
Iconocerf est la banque d'images numériques du CERF et de la SFR.
Conception : R. Duvauferrier, M. Rambeau, M. André
Promotion, fabrication : A. Pilat, laboratoire Schering
Mise au format HTML : B. Pouliquen, H. Lesaux
Serveur de la médiathèque informatique de la faculté de médecine : P. Le Beux, D. Delamarre

Notre serveur vous donne accès à 3860 cas cliniques < 13715 images>
NOUVEAU :(Dernière mise à jour : 12/03/97)

Acquisition des CD ICONOCERF-MEDIMAG

Un accès à tous les cas cliniques par un index général
Accès aux dossiers par l'histoire de la maladie (objectif pédagogique)

Et toujours notre nouvelle ergonomie :

  • Accès aux cas cliniques par des menus et sous-menus
  • Commentaires associés cachés
  • Accès direct aux auteurs des cas cliniques

Neurologie

           [397 cas ]

Faculte de medecine:Sommaire fac. de médecine     Sommaire CERF

 


 
CERF

Par SPINNEUR - Publié dans : CNS/SNC/BRAIN/CERVEAU.
Voir les 0 commentaires
Mercredi 13 septembre 2006 3 13 /09 /Sep /2006 17:42

 

 ICONOCERF-MEDIMAG


Acquisition des CD ICONOCERF-MEDIMAG

 Un accès à tous les cas cliniques par un index général

 Accès aux dossiers par l'histoire de la maladie (objectif pédagogique)

Et toujours notre nouvelle ergonomie :

  • Accès aux cas cliniques par des menus et sous-menus
  • Commentaires associés cachés
  • Accès direct aux auteurs des cas cliniques

-Digestif     585

Sommaire fac. de médecine     Sommaire CERF

 

 

Par - - Publié dans : ABDOMEN ( hors Foie )( except Liver )
Voir les 0 commentaires
Mercredi 13 septembre 2006 3 13 /09 /Sep /2006 13:49

 

ICONOCERF-MEDIMAG

http://irmresonance.over-blog.com/

[English version]
Iconocerf est la banque d'images numériques du CERF et de la SFR.
Conception : R. Duvauferrier, M. Rambeau, M. André
Promotion, fabrication : A. Pilat, laboratoire Schering
Mise au format HTML : B. Pouliquen, H. Lesaux
Serveur de la médiathèque informatique de la faculté de médecine : P. Le Beux, D. Delamarre

Notre serveur vous donne accès à 3860 cas cliniques < 13715 images>
NOUVEAU :(Dernière mise à jour : 12/03/97)

Acquisition des CD ICONOCERF-MEDIMAG

Un accès à tous les cas cliniques par un index général
Accès aux dossiers par l'histoire de la maladie (objectif pédagogique)

Et toujours notre nouvelle ergonomie :

  • Accès aux cas cliniques par des menus et sous-menus
  • Commentaires associés cachés
  • Accès direct aux auteurs des cas cliniques

Neurologie[397]
ORL[335]
Thoracique[228]
Cardio-vasculaire[741]
Digestif[585]
Génito-urinaire[651]
Ostéo-articulaire[375]
Pédiatrie[548]
Divers

Faculte de medecine:Sommaire fac. de médecine     Sommaire CERF
Par SPINNEUR - Publié dans : EDUCATION . CASES REPORTS .EDUCATION .
Voir les 0 commentaires
Mercredi 13 septembre 2006 3 13 /09 /Sep /2006 13:47

L'IRM


Cet examen est en train de transformer le diagnostic du cancer, notamment pour certaines indications. Il conviendra, dans les années futures, de bien préciser les indications respectives du scanner et de l'IRM.

Il existe un certain nombre de dossiers radiologiques très bien faits sur Internet qui permettent aux étudiants de se former à la radiologie (et notamment à l'IRM).

En particulier, grâce au projet Virtual Human Body,

 il est possible de faire des comparaisons très intéressantes avec des coupes anatomiques (constituées à partir de corps de condamnés à mort).

D'autres atlas existent notamment les Guides de Lecture du Scanner et de l'IRM sous la direction du Pr Y.Menu, Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy et distribués par les laboratoires Sanofi-Synthélabo.

De nombreux autres cours existent permettant de s'initier à la radiologie et nous remercions leurs auteurs d'avoir pu sélectionner quelques unes de leurs images.

Nous citerons : 

Nous avons regroupé quelques images caractéristiques en constituant un schéma des lésions et un commentaire du cliché.

Quelques définitions générales par rapport aux plans du corps humain utilisés en tomodensitométrie et en IRM :

Le plan transverse (ou axial) est un plan horizontal perpendiculaire au corps humain debout, qui le divise en une partie supérieure et une partie inférieure. C'est le plan de base de reconstruction en scanner ou IRM

Le plan sagittal est un plan vertical, qui va d'avant en arrière et divise le corps en partie droite et partie gauche. Lorsque la division survient au milieu, on parle de plan médian.

Le plan frontal (ou coronal) est un plan vertical qui va d'un côté à l'autre du corps et le divise en partie antérieure et partie postérieure.

Nous avons regroupé quelques images caractéristiques en réalisant un schéma des lésions et décrivant par un commentaire le cliché.

IRM du cerveau

IRM du thorax

IRM de l'abdomen

IRM de l'appareil génital

IRM des structures osseuses

Cancérologie générale
Pr J.F. HERON
CAEN
  Dernière modification
9 Septembre 2006
Par SPINNEUR - Publié dans : irm resonance magnétique
Voir les 0 commentaires
Mercredi 13 septembre 2006 3 13 /09 /Sep /2006 13:39

IRM  MRI  HYPOPHYSE

Technique d'exploration IRM de l'hypophyse et images normales

Diagnostic : Technique d'exploration IRM de l'hypophyse et images normales

http://pe.sfrnet.org/data/moduleposterelectronique/PDF/2005/dfec1cb0-fa01-4d00-b3cd-635e70de8c0f.pdf



 

 

Elle comporte selon les cas (en fonction de la CLINIQUE et des données des premières séquences) :

1 - Séquence E.S. T1 (3mm d'épaisseur), sagittale et coronale.

2 - Séquence rapide en E.S. T2 (3mm d'épaisseur), coronale.

3 - Etude dynamique, avec injection d'une demi-dose (0,05 mml/kg) de Gadolinium en bolus et des coupes en E.S. de 3mm, coronales, toutes les 30 à 40 secondes (4 à 6 coupes), parfois sagittales (étude hypothalamo-hypophysaire), selon le même protocole.

Parfois étude dans le plan axial, sans et avec Gadolinium, notamment pour l'analyse des sinus caverneux ; enfin, des coupes tardives, 30mn après injection, sont parfois utiles dans le diagnostic des microadénomes.

Consulter les liens (ADM, EdiCerf, ...)

Commentaire du diagnostic : Etude dans les 3 plans de l'hypophyse normale, sans et après injection de Gadolinium.

Codes pseudo-MeSH : HYPOPHYSE| I.R.M.| NORMAL| TECHNIQUES

Auteurs :

 


 

 

  • LE KREMLIN BICETRE

 


 

Commentaire :
(1) post-hypophyse, (étoile) anté-hypophyse, (2) corps mamillaires, (3) tectum ou toit du mésencéphale avec l'aqueduc de Sylvius en avant, (pointe de flèche) commissure blanche antérieure, (flèche verticale) point chiasmatique avec en arrière l'infundibulum, en avant le chiasma optique, au dessus (pointe de flèche) commissure blanche antérieure, tout à fait en avant (double flèche verticale) sinus sphénoïdal. (étoile) : pont ou protubérance.

Type d'image : IRM

Date ou numéro d'image : 08/01/97

Incidence : COUPE SAGITTALE MEDIANE



   
 

Commentaire :
Coupe coronale en T1, d' arrière A, en avant C. A : (flèche horizontale) post-hypophyse, (flèche oblique) IIIème ventricule (fente linéaire en hyposignal), (flèche verticale) sinus sphénoïdal, (pointe de flèche) siphon carotidien. B : (flèche horizontale) tige pituitaire, chiasma optique au dessus, (flèche oblique) partie postérieure du sinus caverneux et du cavum de Meckel, (pointe de flèche) terminaison de la carotide interne avec la cérébrale moyenne en dehors, la cérébrale antérieure en dedans, (étoile) hypophyse. C : (1) chiasma, (2) hypophyse, (3) siphon carotidien.

Type d'image : IRM

Date ou numéro d'image : 08/01/97

Incidence : COUPE CORONALE



   
 

Commentaire :
Coupe horizontale en T1 de haut en bas avec successivement. A : (1) le chiasma et le nerf optique droit, (2) le gyrus rectus, (flèche oblique) la tige pituitaire. B : La post-hypophyse en hypersignal (flèche oblique). C : Hypersignal (flèche oblique), (la post-hypophyse est toujours visible). A noter la procidence des siphons carotidiens vers l'hypophyse (double pointe de flèche).

Type d'image : IRM

Date ou numéro d'image : 08/01/97

Incidence : COUPE HORIZONTALE



   
 

Commentaire :
Etude dynamique avec coupes coronales passant par le chiasma et la tige pituitaire toutes les 28 secondes (4'). A : Avant injection B : 30 secondes après injection Lit capillaire et tige pituitaire opacifiés : ils sont déplacés dans les processus expansifs (flèche oblique). (Signe du pompon). Noter aussi l'opacification des sinus caverneux, bien visible également en C (flèche horizontale). En D et E, l'hypophyse est opacifiée de façon homogène, les sinus caverneux de chaque côté de façon intense.

Type d'image : IRM

Date ou numéro d'image : 08/01/97

Incidence : COUPES CORONALES



   
 

Commentaire :
Coupe coronale passant par la tige pituitaire deux minutes après l'injection. (flèche horizontale) nerf oculomoteur, (flèche oblique) siphons carotidiens, (flèche horizontale épaisse) cavum de Meckel en hyposignal (contenant le ganglion de Gasser), (pointe de flèche) IIIème ventricule, (triangle) tige pituitaire bien opacifiée, de même que l'hypophyse et les sinus caverneux.

Type d'image : IRM

Date ou numéro d'image : 08/01/97

Incidence : COUPE CORONALE



http://irmresonance.over-blog.com/
   

 

Par SPINNEUR - Publié dans : CNS/SNC/BRAIN/CERVEAU.
Voir les 0 commentaires
 
Créer un blog gratuit sur over-blog.com - Contact - C.G.U. - Rémunération en droits d'auteur - Signaler un abus - Articles les plus commentés