Overblog
Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
22 janvier 2014 3 22 /01 /janvier /2014 08:02

 

 The Sinuses of the Dura Mater
 
(Sinus Duræ Matris).
Ophthalmic Veins and Emissary Veins



The sinuses of the dura mater are venous channels which drain the blood from the brain; they are devoid of valves, and are situated between the two layers of the dura mater and lined by endothelium continuous with that which lines the veins.

 

They may be divided into two groups: (1) a postero-superior, at the upper and back part of the skull, and (2) an antero-inferior, at the base of the skull.

   1
  The postero-superior group comprises the    2
Superior Sagittal.
Straight.
Inferior Sagittal.
Two Transverse.
Occipital.


FIG. 566– Superior sagittal sinus laid open after remova of the skull cap. The chordæ Willisii are clearly seen. The venous lacunæ are also well shown; from two of them probes are passed into the superior sagittal sinus. (Poirier and Charpy.) (See enlarged image)
 

  The superior sagittal sinus (sinus sagittalis superior; superior longitudinal sinus) (Figs. 566, 567) occupies the attached or convex margin of the falx cerebri. Commencing at the foramen cecum, through which it receives a vein from the nasal cavity, it runs from before backward,

grooving the inner surface of the frontal, the adjacent margins of the two parietals, and the superior division of the cruciate eminence of the occipital; near the internal occipital protuberance it deviates to one or other side (usually the right), and is continued as the corresponding transverse sinus.

 

 It is triangular in section, narrow in front, and gradually increases in size as it passes backward. Its inner surface presents the openings of the superior cerebral veins, which run, for the most part, obliquely forward, and open chiefly at the back part of the sinus, their orifices being concealed by fibrous folds;

 

numerous fibrous bands (chordæ Willisii) extend transversely across the inferior angle of the sinus; and, lastly, small openings communicate with irregularly shaped venous spaces (venous lacunæ) in the dura mater near the sinus.

 

There are usually three lacunæ on either side of the sinus: a small frontal, a large parietal, and an occipital, intermediate in size between the other two (Sargent 106).

 

Most of the cerebral veins from the outer surface of the hemisphere open into these lacunæ, and numerous arachnoid granulations (Pacchionian bodies) project into them from below.

 

The superior sagittal sinus receives the superior cerebral veins, veins from the diploë and dura mater, and, near the posterior extremity of the sagittal suture, veins from the pericranium, which pass through the parietal foramina.

 

   3
  The numerous communications exist between this sinus and the veins of the nose, scalp, and diploë.    4


FIG. 567– Dura mater and its processes exposed by removing part of the right half of the skull, and the brain. (See enlarged image)
 

  The inferior sagittal sinus (sinus sagittalis inferior; inferior longitudinal sinus) (Fig. 567) is contained in the posterior half or two-thirds of the free margin of the falx cerebri.

 

 It is of a cylindrical form, increases in size as it passes backward, and ends in the straight sinus.

It receives several veins from the falx cerebri, and occasionally a few from the medial surfaces of the hemispheres.

   5

  The straight sinus (sinus rectus; tentorial sinus) (Figs. 567, 569) is situated at the line of junction of the falx cerebri with the tentorium cerebelli.

 

 It is triangular in section, increases in size as it proceeds backward, and runs downward and backward from the end of the inferior sagittal sinus to the transverse sinus of the opposite side to that into which the superior sagittal sinus is prolonged.

 

Its terminal part communicates by a cross branch with the confluence of the sinuses. Besides the inferior sagittal sinus, it receives the great cerebral vein (great vein of Galen) and the superior cerebellar veins. A few transverse bands cross its interior.

   6


FIG. 568– Sagittal section of the skull, showing the sinuses of the dura. (See enlarged image)
 


FIG. 569– Tentorium cerebelli from above. (See enlarged image)
 


FIG. 570– The sinuses at the base of the skull. (See enlarged image)
 

  The transverse sinuses (sinus transversus; lateral sinuses) (Figs. 569, 570) are of large size and begin at the internal occipital protuberance; one, generally the right, being the direct continuation of the superior sagittal sinus, the other of the straight sinus.

 

Each transverse sinus passes lateralward and forward, describing a slight curve with its convexity upward, to the base of the petrous portion of the temporal bone, and lies, in this part of its course, in the attached margin of the tentorium cerebelli;

 it then leaves the tentorium and curves downward and medialward to reach the jugular foramen, where it ends in the internal jugular vein.

In its course it rests upon the squama of the occipital, the mastoid angle of the parietal, the mastoid part of the temporal, and, just before its termination, the jugular process of the occipital; the portion which occupies the groove on the mastoid part of the temporal is sometimes termed the sigmoid sinus.

 The transverse sinuses are frequently of unequal size, that formed by the superior sagittal sinus being the larger;

they increase in size as they proceed from behind forward.

On transverse section the horizontal portion exhibits a prismatic, the curved portion a semicylindrical form.

They receive the blood from the superior petrosal sinuses at the base of the petrous portion of the temporal bone;

they communicate with the veins of the pericranium by means of the mastoid and condyloid emissary veins; and they receive some of the inferior cerebral and inferior cerebellar veins, and some veins from the diploë.

The petrosquamous sinus, when present, runs backward along the junction of the squama and petrous portion of the temporal, and opens into the transverse sinus.

   7

  The occipital sinus (sinus occipitalis) (Fig. 570) is the smallest of the cranial sinuses.

 

 It is situated in the attached margin of the falx cerebelli, and is generally single, but occasionally there are two. It commences around the margin of the foramen magnum by several small venous channels, one of which joins the terminal part of the transverse sinus;

it communicates with the posterior internal vertebral venous plexuses and ends in the confluence of the sinuses.

   8

  The Confluence of the Sinuses (confluens sinuum; torcular Herophili) is the term applied to the dilated extremity of the superior sagittal sinus.

 It is of irregular form, and is lodged on one side (generally the right) of the internal occipital protuberance. From it the transverse sinus of the same side is derived.

It receives also the blood from the occipital sinus, and is connected across the middle line with the commencement of the transverse sinus of the opposite side.

   9
  The antero-inferior group of sinuses comprises the    10
Two Cavernous.
Two Superior Petrosal.
Two Intercavernous
Two Inferior Petrosal.
Basilar Plexus.
  

 

  The cavernous sinuses (sinus cavernosus) (Figs. 570, 571) are so named because they present a reticulated structure, due to their being traversed by numerous interlacing filaments.

They are of irregular form, larger behind than in front, and are placed one on either side of the body of the sphenoid bone, extending from the superior orbital fissure to the apex of the petrous portion of the temporal bone.

Each opens behind into the petrosal sinuses.

On the medial wall of each sinus is the internal carotid artery, accompanied by filaments of the carotid plexus; near the artery is the abducent nerve; on the lateral wall are the oculomotor and trochlear nerves, and the ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the trigeminal nerve (Fig. 571).

These structures are separated from the blood flowing along the sinus by the lining membrane of the sinus.

The cavernous sinus receives the superior ophthalmic vein through the superior orbital fissure, some of the cerebral veins, and also the small sphenoparietal sinus, which courses along the under surface of the small wing of the sphenoid.

It communicates with the transverse sinus by means of the superior petrosal sinus; with the internal jugular vein through the inferior petrosal sinus and a plexus of veins on the internal carotid artery;

 with the pterygoid venous plexus through the foramen Vesalii, foramen ovale, and foramen lacerum, and with the angular vein through the ophthalmic vein.

The two sinuses also communicate with each other by means of the anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses.

   11


FIG. 571– Oblique section through the cavernous sinus. (See enlarged image)
 
  The ophthalmic veins (Fig. 572), two in number, superior and inferior, are devoid of valves.    12

  The Superior Ophthalmic Vein (v. ophthalmica superior)

 begins at the inner angle of the orbit in a vein named the nasofrontal which communicates anteriorly with the angular vein; it pursues the same course as the ophthalmic artery, and receives tributaries corresponding to the branches of that vessel.

Forming a short single trunk, it passes between the two heads of the Rectus lateralis and through the medial part of the superior orbital fissure, and ends in the cavernous sinus.

   13

  The Inferior Ophthalmic Vein (v. ophthalmica inferior) begins in a venous net-work at the forepart of the floor and medial wall of the orbit;

 it receives some veins from the Rectus inferior, Obliquus inferior, lacrimal sac and eyelids, runs backward in the lower part of the orbit and divides into two branches.

One of these passes through the inferior orbital fissure and joins the pterygoid venous plexus, while the other enters the cranium through the superior orbital fissure and ends in the cavernous sinus, either by a separate opening, or more frequently in common with the superior ophthalmic vein.

   14


FIG. 572– Veins of orbit. (Poirier and Charpy.)
 

  The intercavernous sinuses (sini intercavernosi) (Fig. 570) are two in number, an anterior and a posterior, and connect the two cavernous sinuses across the middle line.

 

The anterior passes in front of the hypophysis cerebri, the posterior behind it, and they form with the cavernous sinuses a venous circle (circular sinus) around the hypophysis. The anterior one is usually the larger of the two, and one or other is occasionally absent.

   15

  The superior petrosal sinus (sinus petrosus superior) small and narrow, connects the cavernous with the transverse sinus.

 It runs lateralward and backward, from the posterior end of the cavernous sinus, over the trigeminal nerve, and lies in the attached margin of the tentorium cerebelli and in the superior petrosal sulcus of the temporal bone; it joins the transverse sinus where the latter curves downward on the inner surface of the mastoid part of the temporal.

 It receives some cerebellar and inferior cerebral veins, and veins from the tympanic cavity.

   16
  The inferior petrosal sinus (sinus petrosus inferior) (Fig. 570) is situated in the inferior petrosal sulcus formed by the junction of the petrous part of the temporal with the basilar part of the occipital. It begins in the postero-inferior part of the cavernous sinus, and, passing through the anterior part of the jugular foramen, ends in the superior bulb of the internal jugular vein. The inferior petrosal sinus receives the internal auditory veins and also veins from the medulla oblongata, pons, and under surface of the cerebellum.    17

  The exact relation of the parts to one another in the jugular foramen is as follows: the inferior petrosal sinus lies medially and anteriorly with the meningeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery, and is directed obliquely downward and backward;

 the transverse sinus is situated at the lateral and back part of the foramen with a meningeal branch of the occipital artery, and between the two sinuses are the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.

 

 These three sets of structures are divided from each other by two processes of fibrous tissue. The junction of the inferior petrosal sinus with the internal jugular vein takes place on the lateral aspect of the nerves.

   18

  The basilar plexus (plexus basilaris; transverse or basilar sinus)

(Fig. 571) consists of several interlacing venous channels between the layers of the dura mater over the basilar part of the occipital bone, and serves to connect the two inferior petrosal sinuses. It communicates with the anterior vertebral venous plexus.

   19
 

Emissary Veins (emissaria).

The emissary veins pass through apertures in the cranial wall and establish communication between the sinuses inside the skull and the veins external to it. Some are always present, others only occasionally so.

The principal emissary veins are the following: (1)

A mastoid emissary vein, usually present, runs through the mastoid foramen and unites the transverse sinus with the posterior auricular or with the occipital vein. (2) A parietal emissary vein passes through the parietal foramen and connects the superior sagittal sinus with the veins of the scalp.

(3) A net-work of minute veins (rete canalis hypoglossi) traverses the hypoglossal canal and joins the transverse sinus with the vertebral vein and deep veins of the neck.

 

(4) An inconstant condyloid emissary vein passes through the condyloid canal and connects the transverse sinus with the deep veins of the neck. (5) A net-work of veins (rete foraminis ovalis) unites the cavernous sinus with the pterygoid plexus through the foramen ovale. (6) Two or three small veins run through the foramen lacerum and connect the cavernous sinus with the pterygoid plexus. (7) The emissary vein of the foramen of Vesalius connects the same parts. (8) An internal carotid plexus of veins traverses the carotid canal and unites the cavernous sinus with the internal jugular vein. (9) A vein is transmitted through the foramen cecum and connects the superior sagittal sinus with the veins of the nasal cavity.

   20
Note 106.  Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, vol. xlv. 

 

 
    
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 
     11


 
  .    12
     13
      14


 
     15
      16
      17
      18
      19
 
.    20


   
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

1 décembre 2013 7 01 /12 /décembre /2013 15:02

http://www.iurc.montp.inserm.fr/cric/audition/start2.htm

 

 

La cochlée
Généralités / Physique / Fluides / Strie vasculaire / QCM
Dessins : S. Blatrix



La cochlée, autrefois appelée limaçon, représente la partie "auditive" de l'oreille interne. C'est l'enroulement en spirale de cette structure, au cours du développement, qui lui vaut son nom.

Cochlée d'un foetus humain de 5 mois de gestation

La capsule otique a été enlevée, découvrant les 2,5 tours de spire du labyrinthe membraneux (35 mm de longueur). Les fenêtres ovale (flèche bleue) et ronde (flèche jaune) sont mentionnées.
Notons que dès ce stade précoce, le développement morphologique de la cochlée est achevé. Echelle : 5 mm
M. Lavigne-Rebillard

Section axiale (modiolaire) de la cochlée
Plan de coupe
Cette section schématise l'enroulement du canal cochléaire (1) contenant l'endolymphe, et celui des rampes vestibulaire (2) tympanique (3) contenant la périlymphe. La flèche rouge vient de la fenêtre ovale et la bleue aboutit à la fenêtre ronde. Au centre, (modiolus) le ganglion spiral (4) et les fibres du nerf cochléaire (5) apparaissent en jaune.
Pour les détails, voir ci-dessous la coupe d'un seul tour.

Section transversale au niveau d'un tour de spire de la cochlée

 


Le canal cochléaire (1), contenant l'endolymphe sécrétée par la strie vasculaire (7), est isolé de la rampe vestibulaire (2) par la membrane de Reissner (4). L'organe de Corti est recouvert par la membrane tectoriale (6) flottant dans l'endolymphe ; il repose sur la membrane basilaire (5) au contact de la rampe tympanique (3). La lame spirale osseuse (9) relie l'organe de Corti au ganglion (8).


spire cochléaire d'une cochlée de rat
(Microscopie électronique à balayage)
  La cochlée
Généralités / Physique / Fluides / Strie vasculaire / QCM
Dessins : S. Blatrix
 


La cochlée, autrefois appelée limaçon, représente la partie "auditive" de l'oreille interne. C'est l'enroulement en spirale de cette structure, au cours du développement, qui lui vaut son nom.

Cochlée d'un foetus humain de 5 mois de gestation
La capsule otique a été enlevée, découvrant les 2,5 tours de spire du labyrinthe membraneux (35 mm de longueur). Les fenêtres ovale (flèche bleue) et ronde (flèche jaune) sont mentionnées.
Notons que dès ce stade précoce, le développement morphologique de la cochlée est achevé. Echelle : 5 mm 
 
 M. Lavigne-Rebillard
 

Section axiale (modiolaire) de la cochlée
Plan de coupe
Cette section schématise l'enroulement du canal cochléaire (1) contenant l'endolymphe, et celui des rampes vestibulaire (2) tympanique (3) contenant la périlymphe. La flèche rouge vient de la fenêtre ovale et la bleue aboutit à la fenêtre ronde. Au centre, (modiolus) le ganglion spiral (4) et les fibres du nerf cochléaire (5) apparaissent en jaune.
Pour les détails, voir ci-dessous la coupe d'un seul tour.

Section transversale au niveau d'un tour de spire de la cochlée

 

Le canal cochléaire (1), contenant l'endolymphe sécrétée par la strie vasculaire (7), est isolé de la rampe vestibulaire (2) par la membrane de Reissner (4). L'organe de Corti est recouvert par la membrane tectoriale (6) flottant dans l'endolymphe ; il repose sur la membrane basilaire (5) au contact de la rampe tympanique (3). La lame spirale osseuse (9) relie l'organe de Corti au ganglion (8).


spire cochléaire d'une cochlée de rat
(Microscopie électronique à balayage)

Chez le rat, la membrane basilaire a une longueur de 22 mm, sur trois tours de spire (comparer avec la cochlée humaine).Echelle : 2 mm

(la capsule otique, la strie vasculaire et la membrane tectoriale ont été enlevées)

M. Lenoir 

 


 
Tous droits réservés © 1999/2004 CRIC et les auteurs
Pour toute autorisation d'utilisation d'éléments du site nous contacter
  
Début de page
haut de page

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 
  La cochlée
Généralités / Physique / Fluides / Strie vasculaire / QCM
Dessins : S. Blatrix
 


La cochlée, autrefois appelée limaçon, représente la partie "auditive" de l'oreille interne. C'est l'enroulement en spirale de cette structure, au cours du développement, qui lui vaut son nom.

Cochlée d'un foetus humain de 5 mois de gestation
La capsule otique a été enlevée, découvrant les 2,5 tours de spire du labyrinthe membraneux (35 mm de longueur). Les fenêtres ovale (flèche bleue) et ronde (flèche jaune) sont mentionnées.
Notons que dès ce stade précoce, le développement morphologique de la cochlée est achevé. Echelle : 5 mm 
 
 M. Lavigne-Rebillard
 

Section axiale (modiolaire) de la cochlée
Plan de coupe
Cette section schématise l'enroulement du canal cochléaire (1) contenant l'endolymphe, et celui des rampes vestibulaire (2) tympanique (3) contenant la périlymphe. La flèche rouge vient de la fenêtre ovale et la bleue aboutit à la fenêtre ronde. Au centre, (modiolus) le ganglion spiral (4) et les fibres du nerf cochléaire (5) apparaissent en jaune.
Pour les détails, voir ci-dessous la coupe d'un seul tour.

Section transversale au niveau d'un tour de spire de la cochlée

 

Le canal cochléaire (1), contenant l'endolymphe sécrétée par la strie vasculaire (7), est isolé de la rampe vestibulaire (2) par la membrane de Reissner (4). L'organe de Corti est recouvert par la membrane tectoriale (6) flottant dans l'endolymphe ; il repose sur la membrane basilaire (5) au contact de la rampe tympanique (3). La lame spirale osseuse (9) relie l'organe de Corti au ganglion (8).


spire cochléaire d'une cochlée de rat
(Microscopie électronique à balayage)

Chez le rat, la membrane basilaire a une longueur de 22 mm, sur trois tours de spire (comparer avec la cochlée humaine).Echelle : 2 mm

(la capsule otique, la strie vasculaire et la membrane tectoriale ont été enlevées)

M. Lenoir 

 


 
Tous droits réservés © 1999/2004 CRIC et les auteurs
Pour toute autorisation d'utilisation d'éléments du site nous contacter
  
Début de page
haut de page

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 
  La cochlée
Généralités / Physique / Fluides / Strie vasculaire / QCM
Dessins : S. Blatrix
 


La cochlée, autrefois appelée limaçon, représente la partie "auditive" de l'oreille interne. C'est l'enroulement en spirale de cette structure, au cours du développement, qui lui vaut son nom.

Cochlée d'un foetus humain de 5 mois de gestation
La capsule otique a été enlevée, découvrant les 2,5 tours de spire du labyrinthe membraneux (35 mm de longueur). Les fenêtres ovale (flèche bleue) et ronde (flèche jaune) sont mentionnées.
Notons que dès ce stade précoce, le développement morphologique de la cochlée est achevé. Echelle : 5 mm 
 
 M. Lavigne-Rebillard
 
1 décembre 2013 7 01 /12 /décembre /2013 14:21

" MISSMATCH  "EFFECT MRI    effet " MISSMATCH "

   PENUMBRA ZONE   Zone de pénombre .

   CNS Stroke , AVC  DIFFUSION T2 T2W

 


   La zone de missmatch

    correspond au " différentiel " entre :

 

1   la ZONE d 'ISCHEMIE

        i.e zone de NECROSE IRREVERSIBLE NON perfusée

        vue sur la DWI , Séquence en DIFFUSION


      et 


2   la ZONE d'OLIGEMIE

        i.e   zone mal perfusée

        vue sur la PERFUSION .

-----------------

 

  MISSMATCH ZONE

   =  zone théoriquement " récupérable"

        zone de souffrance

 


 

 

.

 

 

 

5 avril 2013 5 05 /04 /avril /2013 22:00

 

 Etude IRM de

 l ' HIPPOCAMPE de

l 'ALZHEIMER INCIPIENS


  PROTEINE TAU  TAUOPATHIES             PHOSPHORYLATION

http://irmresonance.over-blog.com/article-4895859.html

 

 

http://www.uku.fi/neuro/37the.htm


DETECTION IRM  

 

http://www.futura-sciences.com/news-alzheimer-avancee-detection-maladie-grace-irm_5791.php

 


 

 

 ALZHEIMER 

 Diagnostics différentiels .

 http://www.alzheimer-montpellier.org/dgdff.html


 

 Anatomie Hippocampe  coupe SAGITTALE      http://perso.wanadoo.fr/adna/hippocampus.gif

     

 


 

  coupe sagittale  :

http://www.inrp.fr/Acces/biotic/neuro/plasticite/images/hippocampe-dans-cerveau.jpg

 

 

  http://www.inrp.fr/Acces/biotic/neuro/plasticite/


 

 

 

 

 

20 novembre 2012 2 20 /11 /novembre /2012 13:51

 

 

T1 FLAIR  ( GE HEAMTHCARE )

 

PULSE D 'INVERSION  

et

 

ECHO DE SPIN RAPIDE à TI Moyen

 ( 350 - 800ms )

 

donne une forte pondération T1

 

 

T1 IR TSE

Real IR TSE   ( PHILIPS )

 

 

IR T1 ( SIEMENS )

17 novembre 2012 6 17 /11 /novembre /2012 18:05

 CALCUL de l’ADC  IRM DIFFUSION

Méthode Pour s’affranchir des effets T2 inclus

dans les images pondérées en diffusion, et pouvoir différencier fiablement,

 

 

parmi les structures en hyper signal, celles dont l’ADC est bas ,

de celles dont l’hypersignal est dû à un effet T2,

 

 

il est nécessaire de calculer le coefficient de diffusion

 

(ADC = Apparent Diffusion Coefficient). 


Ce coefficient est calculé automatiquement par les logiciels constructeurs à partir d‘une comparaison des 2 images acquises au même niveau du cerveau

 

(image pondérée en T2 et image pondérée en diffusion).


L’ADC en un point du cerveau correspond à la

 

pente de décroissance du signal

(sur une échelle logarithmique)

 

 

entre l’image pondérée en T2 et l’image pondérée en diffusion.

 Il est traduit en chaque point du cerveau sur la carte d’ADC par une échelle de couleur allant usuellement du rouge (ADC élevé) au bleu (ADC faible).

 

 

 

Une forte décroissance du signal entre les deux images traduit donc un

ADC élevé (pente forte, ex LCR, rouge),

 

 

et une décroissance faible un ADC faible (pente faible, ex AVC aigu, bleu).


 Valeurs normales


Au total, l’ADC ne dépend ni du champ magnétique, ni du type de séquence, ni du T1 et du T2, mais seulement de la nature biologique du tissu examiné.
- LCR = 3 x 10-3 mm2/sec

  Exemples chez l’adulte :
- SG = 0.8 x 10-3 mm2/sec
- SB = 0.3 à 1.2 x 10-3 mm2/sec

 

Les variations spatiales de l’ADC s’expliquent par les différences d’architecture cellulaire entre cortex et substance blanche, ainsi que de la compacité et l’organisation spatiale des fibres blanches dans les différents territoires.

* Le cerveau immature du petit enfant étant moins myélinisé que celui de l’adulte, il contient plus d’eau libre (plus de diffusion), et la diffusion est moins contrainte par les gaines de myéline (moins d’anisotropie).

Les valeurs d’ADC sont donc variables en fonction de l’âge.

Il est important de disposer de références normales en fonction de l’âge pour évaluer les patients.

Ces références sont rares dans la littérature. Pour exemple (1):
- SB du centre semi-ovale
1.5 x 10-3 mm2/sec entre 0 et 2 mois
0.8 x 10-3 mm2/sec après 36 mois
- Ganglions de la base
1.18 x 10-3 mm2/sec entre 0 et 2 mois
0.83 x 10-3 mm2/sec après 36 mois
- Cortex
1.25 x 10-3 mm2/sec entre 0 et 2 mois
1 x 10-3 mm2/sec après 36 mois.

4) En pathologie
a) ADC diminué
De façon générale, une diminution de l’ADC est liée à la présence d’un œdème cytotoxique, dont l’exemple le plus connu chez l’adulte est la souffrance ischémique à la phase aiguë.

Cependant, chez l’enfant, les causes de diminution de l’ADC sont beaucoup plus variées que chez l’adulte (2) :

b) ADC augmenté

 

Un ADC augmenté correspond le plus souvent à un œdème vasogénique et/ou à des lésions démyélinisantes.
Les causes en sont donc multiples, comme chez l’adulte :
- œdème vasogénique péri lésionnel (tumeurs, abcès, contusion, ...), thrombose veineuse, encéphalopathie hypertensive, ...
- lésions démyélinisantes de toute nature (leucodystrophies, encéphalomyélite aigüe post-infectieuse, sclérose en plaques, ...)

c) Quelques cas particuliers

* L’anoxo-ischémie de l’enfant.
Chez l’adulte, l’évolution de l’ADC en fonction du temps après un AVC est bien décrite avec une chute dès la première heure, un nadir vers 36-48h, une remontée progressive avec une pseudo-normalisation vers le 3eme-5eme jour, puis une augmentation au delà de la normale, persistante à distance (nécrose, gliose). Les AVC capsulo-lenticulaires de l’enfant se comportent de façon globalement comparable.

 

 

 

 

 


En revanche, la sensibilité et l’évolution de l’ADC dans les souffrances périnatales est plus incertaine. Si la souffrance de la SB est le plus souvent bien détectée dans les premiers jours (3), il n’en est pas toujours de même pour l’atteinte des noyaux gris centraux qui peut être douteuse voire inapparente dans les formes modérées, malgré une évolution clinique préoccupante (4). Le caractère le plus souvent bilatéral et symétrique des lésions empêche toute comparaison à l’hémisphère contro-latéral. La comparaison à des valeurs « normales » de patients du même âge peut prendre tout son intérêt. Un ADC bas dans le bras postérieur de la capsule interne serait de mauvais pronostic (5).

* Les tumeurs cérébrales.
Comme chez l’adulte, l’ADC est un reflet de l’architecture et de la cellularité tumorales.
Les tumeurs de haut grade, très cellulaires (ex médulloblastomes), ont un ADC plutôt bas (environ 1 à 1.5 x 10-3 mm2/sec), alors que les tumeurs de bas grade, peu cellulaires, avec un abondant tissu interstitiel (ex Astrocytome pilocytique, ou DNT), ont un ADC élevé (souvent aux environs de 2 à 2.5 x 10-3 mm2/sec ).

 

 La diffusion peut donc aider à la caractérisation tumorale, en association avec l’imagerie conventionnelle et la spectroscopie.

 

 

A noter enfin que l’imagerie de diffusion est un très bon moyen
diagnostique des images en cocarde pour différencier une tumeur kystique ou nécrotique d’un abcès : le kyste ou la nécrose tumorale ont un ADC très élevé (plutôt « rouge »), alors que l’abcès collecté a constamment un ADC effondré (<1 x 10-3 mm2/sec , franchement « bleu »).







* Les épilepsies
L’imagerie de diffusion fait l’objet d’intenses recherches pour localiser le foyer ictal dans les épilepsies focales, en particulier cryptogéniques. De nombreux auteurs ont décrit une diminution transitoire et modérée de l’ADC en post-ictal précoce suivie d’une augmentation , dans le foyer épileptogène (œdème cytotoxique puis œdème vasogénique réactionnel ?). Dans les crises prolongées ou sévères, on peut voir une diminution de l’ADC, parfois suivi d’une atrophie focale. Cependant, les variations d’ADC sont souvent subtiles, modérées et usuellement transitoires, ce qui rend leur appréciation encore difficile en routine clinique.

-----


- souffrance anoxo-ischémique
- faillite énergétique endogène (déficits de la chaîne respiratoire dans certaines cytopathies mitochondriales)

6 octobre 2012 6 06 /10 /octobre /2012 16:19


NEUROCYTOME CENTRAL

central neurocytoma

 

 

 

 

-

8 septembre 2012 6 08 /09 /septembre /2012 20:22

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cyyang/sets/1579907/

MNEMONIQUE   HEMOORAGIES CEREBRALES  TDM  IRM
BRAIN HEMORRHAGES  CT MRI MR

http://www.radswiki.net/main/index.php?title=Intracranial_hemorrhage_on_MRI_mnemonic

     -

-



-


-




-





-


-





HYPERACUTE HEMATOMA




-






-

1 juin 2012 5 01 /06 /juin /2012 19:37

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHYSIOLOGIE DE L'AUDITION


SOMMAIRE

 

OREILLE EXTERNE      
OREILLE MOYENNE TROMPE D'EUSTACHE

PHYSIOLOGIE DE L'AUDITION


SOMMAIRE

 

OREILLE EXTERNE      
OREILLE MOYENNE TROMPE D'EUSTACHE    
OREILLE INTERNE 1 OREILLE INTERNE 2 OREILLE INTERNE 3  
VOIE AUDITIVE CENTRALE 1 VOIE AUDITIVE CENTRALE 2 VOIE AUDITIVE CENTRALE 3 VOIE AUDITIVE CENTRALE 4

 

 
 Vous pouvez de plus consulter le site "Promenade dans la cochlée" Pr R. Pujols: http://www.iurc.montp.inserm.fr/cric/audition/start.htm 
 
OREILLE INTERNE 1 OREILLE INTERNE 2 OREILLE INTERNE 3  
VOIE AUDITIVE CENTRALE 1 VOIE AUDITIVE CENTRALE 2 VOIE AUDITIVE CENTRALE 3 VOIE AUDITIVE CENTRALE 4

 

 
 Vous pouvez de plus consulter le site "Promenade dans la cochlée" Pr R. Pujols: http://www.iurc.montp.inserm.fr/cric/audition/start.htm 

 

 

PHYSIOLOGIE DE L'OREILLE INTERNE (1)

 


 

 

SOMMAIRE

 

La cochlée est un tube enroulé sur lui même sur 2 tours 1/2 de spire. La membrane basilaire divise ce tube en deux rampes: vestibulaire en haut, tympanique en bas qui communiquent entre elles à l'apex. La rampe vestibulaire est fermée par la platine de l'étrier qui s'articule dans la fosse ovale (FO) . La rampe tympanique est fermée par la membrane de la fenêtre ronde (FR ).

   
 

 

 Vue déroulée de la cochlée
 
     

 

PHYSIOLOGIE DE LA MEMBRANE BASILAIRE

La membrane basilaire, sur laquelle repose les cellules de l'organe de Corti, s'élargie régulièrement de la base vers l'apex de la cochlée et sa rigidité diminue de la même manière. Ainsi la déformation de cette membrane se fait de façon préférentielle en fonction de la fréquence du son stimulant.

   
 

LES SONS DE FREQUENCE AIGUE DEFORMENT PREFERENTIELLEMENT LA REGION DE LA BASE,

LES SONS DE FREQUENCE GRAVE CELLES DE L'APEX.

 

   La cochlée comporte deux rampes communiquant entre elles par l'hélicotréma, les rampes tympanique et vestibulaire qui contiennent un liquide, la périlymphe. Le canal cochléaire contient l'endolymphe.  
Ces deux liquides sont de composition chimique totalement différente: la périlymphe est de type extracellulaire, l'endolymphe de type intracellulaire.  

 

 Endolymphe

 

 Périlymphe

 

 Na = 1nM/l

 

 

K = 150nM/l

 

 

Cl = 130 nM/l

 

 

Protéines = 0,3g/l

 

 Na = 150 nM/l

 

 

K = 7 nM/l

 

 

Cl = 110 nM/l

 

 

Protéines = 1g/l
 
     
 

 La charge électrique de l'endolymphe est de +80 à +100 mV alors que la charge à l'intérieur d'une cellule ciliée est de - 80 mV.

Il existe donc, au repos, une différence de potentiel de - 160 à -180 mV entre ces deux structures.

Cette différence de potentiel est à la base des phénomènes électrophysiologiques de l'audition.

 
   Lors d'une stimulation acoustique, une région particulière de la membrane basilaire est déformée, les cellules ciliées internes vont subir les mêmes déplacements. Au pôle supérieur des cellules ciliées internes, l'orientation des cils est modifiée par le mouvement de la membrane tectoriale qui flotte dans le liquide endolymphatique avec une certaine inertie.  
   La modification de la position des cils déclenche une modification de la perméabilité, de la paroi des cellules ciliées internes correspondantes, au K+ et une modification de la différence de potentiel.  

SOMMAIRE

1 juin 2012 5 01 /06 /juin /2012 18:37

-------------- 

6. Céphalées et migraines

Les céphalées constituent une des causes les plus fréquentes de consultation en pédiatrie [5]. Dans la grande majorité des cas, il s’agit de migraines et de céphalées psychogènes chez les enfants d’âge scolaire et les adolescents.

 

 


L’imagerie est rarement utile en l’absence d’élément clinique d’appel faisant suspecter des céphalées lésionnelles [14].
- douleurs permanentes ou augmentant en fréquence ou en intensité
- douleurs nocturnes ou aux changements de position, à la défécation, à l’effort
- changement de comportement et/ou du caractère, épilepsie ou anomalies à l’examen neurologique.
L’IRM est plus performante que le scanner pour rechercher des malformations vasculaires non rompues, une malformation de Chiari 1, voire une dissection carotidienne ou vertébrale.
En pratique quotidienne, le scanner sans injection de produit de contraste, est le plus souvent suffisant pour éliminer une pathologie tumorale ou une hémorragie méningée.

7. Les symptomatologies médullaires aiguës

Il s’agit de la seule urgence véritable en IRM, à la recherche d’une compression médullaire.
En l’absence de tumeur intracanalaire, il faut penser à une maladie inflammatoire cérébro médullaire et, dans ce cadre, pratiquer (non nécessairement en urgence) une étude complète de la moelle avec des séquences STIR, à la recherche de plaques ou d’anomalies de signal intramédullaires (myélite transverse, plaques de SEP). Dans ce cadre, il est indispensable de pratiquer au moins une séquence FLAIR sur l’encéphale à la recherche de plaques sus ou soustentorielles infracliniques.

8. Le torticolis persistant

Lorsque les radiographies du rachis cervical de face et de profil sont normales (absence de malformation vertébrale, de vertébra plana…), il est indispensable de pratiquer une IRM cérébrale afin de vérifier, non pas tant l’absence d’une tumeur de la fosse postérieure qui peut être éliminée sur un scanner, mais surtout l’absence de malformation de Chiari.

 

 Dans cette hypothèse, la présence d’une symptomatologie d’effort est très évocatrice du diagnostic : il peut s’agir de céphalées d’effort, voire de radiculalgie d’effort.

Table 1 : Traumatismes crâniens de l’adulte.
Classification clnique selon DJ Masters et al [19]

Groupe 1 (risques faibles)

• patients asymptomatiques
• céphalées
• sensation de vertiges
• hématome, blessure, contusion ou abrasion du scalp
• absence de signe des groupes 2 et 3


Groupe 2 (risques modérés)

• vomissements
• modification de la conscience
• céphalées croissantes
• crise comitiale
• histoire peu fiable
• prise de substance
• lésions faciales sévères
• signes de fracture basilaire
• fractures avec dépression ou pénétrante


Groupe 3 (risques élevés)

• altération du niveau de conscience
• diminution progressive de l'état de conscience
• signes neurologiques focaux
• plaie pénétrante
• embarrure
• polytraumatisme (au moins deux lésions)

Tableau 2 :
Indication de l'imagerie dans les traumatismes craniens du nourrisson et de l'enfant

Pas de radio de crâne
(sauf maltraitance)
Scanographie en cas de
  • vomissements répétés ou
après intervalle libre
  • signes neurologique focaux
  • convulsions
  • troubles de la conscience
initiaux ou secondaires
  • suspicion de maltraitance
  • embarrure, lésion
pénétrante et plaie sévère de
la face
  • polytraumatisme

 

Tableau 3
Critères du diagnostic des neurofibromatoses de type 1 [25]

Le diagnostic de NF est établi sur la présence d’au moins 2 des critères suivants :
- au moins 6 taches café au lait de plus de 5mm de diamètre chez les individus prépubères et de plus de 15mm chez des individus pubères,
- au moins 2 neurofibromes ou un neurofibrome plexiforme,
- des lentigines axillaires ou inguinales,
- un gliome des voies optiques,
- au moins 2 nodules de Lisch,
- une lésion osseuse caractéristique comme une dysplasie sphénoïde, un amincissement de la corticale des os longs avec ou sans pseudarthrose,
- un parent du premier degré atteint de NF suivant les critères précédents.